04 – Australien: Paul Ashton

Die erste Station meiner Reise in die Public History ist Australien – mein Gast ist Paul Ashton.

Link zu Paul Ashton: 

Genannte Literatur 

  • Ashton, Paul, Alex Trapeznik (Hg.): What is Public History Globally? Working With the Past in the Present, London 2019.
  • Raphael, Samuel: Theatres of Memory, London 1994.
  • Rickard, John: Packagin the Past? Public Histories, Melbourne 1991.

Literatur zum Thema „Class“

  • El-Mafaalani, Aladin: Vom Arbeiterkind zum Akademiker. Über die Mühen des Aufstiegs durch Bildung. Sankt Augustin 2014.
  • Graf, Angela, Christina Möller (Hg.): Bildung – Macht – Eliten. Zur Reproduktion sozialer Ungleichheit. Für Michael Hartmann, Frankfurt 2015.
  • Reuter, Julia Reuter, Markus Camper, Christina Möller, Frerk Blume (Hg.): Vom Arbeiterkind zur Professur. Sozialer Aufstieg in der Wissenschaft. Autobiographische Notizen und soziobiographische Analysen, Bielefeld 2020.

Genannte Zeitschriften, Blog-Journals, Datenbanken, Gesellschaften, Sendeformate

Zurück zur Übersichtsseite

Comments
  • Giusy Correggia
    November 29, 2021Antworten

    Very often, the past and the present, tradition and modernity collide, generating conflict and often change. This also concerns the clash between academic and public history, which certainly represents a more modern and above all inclusive approach. Paul Ashton expresses this concept, this conflict and the resulting change through one sentence in particular, which is able to show history in an innovative, public way: ”History is not a pyramid with academic on the top, it is an incredibly broad spectrum of practises all of which are important and useful and we need to share that authority across that spectrum.”
    This shows that public history brings together a wide range of actors, e.g. whole communities, but also individuals, minorities etc., to reconstruct a common past that belongs to everyone and is not closed in academic spheres. Thinking about history in this way means understanding how history is useful for the present and how it can be applied in a practical way, having an impact on institutions for example.
    Another concept that I found very interesting and worth further investigation is colonialism. Paul Ashton says: “We are in a postcolonial context still, colonialism has embedded itself in our culture and it is expressing in different ways”. In Italy, at my university, I had the opportunity to read a book about it (I’m sorry, I don’t remember the name. It was about Sociology). Some experiences have not been elaborated, or rather have not been properly addressed, but manipulated; one of these experiences is colonialism. Traumas, genocides and sufferings caused by colonialism have not been dealt with in the right way, but partly hushed up, hidden; hiding a trauma sometimes means justifying or accepting it. This has meant that ideas and values related to that era are still alive and strongly rooted in modern society; consider racism for example, sexism. In Italy, it is easy to hear sentences like ‚I am not racist, BUT…“and catcalling is a very common phenomenon. This has partly to do with an inadequate understanding of history. I think that reconstructing history through different sources, direct experiences and without an academic/hierarchical approach might be one of the first steps to try to eradicate these ideologies.

    • Antonia David
      März 11, 2022Antworten

      I’d like to contribute something to the second point you mentioned. The example of racism as a continuition of the colonial past is (in my opinion) an exellent example of what happens if we stick to the traditional ways of dealing with the past. It shows, how strongly connected events of the past with our daily behaviour/experiences are. In this Podcast Episode, I had the sense that showing these connection is one topic the public history adresses and the tradtitional, academic history probably lacks of. I thought a lot about the aspect of telling unheard history (in this podcast also the example of australian children living in horrible institutions, but also applies to the colonial past) and how we can shift the telling of history in a way, that we understand the continuities of the past in our day to day life. I’d also really be interested in the methods, when academic (and often white) researchers work together with indigenious people. Especially regarding the aspect on who takes the credit for the work and how the visibility of the history told by inigenous people is secured. I imagine it a difficult process with a lot of danger to reproduce these structures, regarding the post-colonial structures we live in
      The interview with Paul Ashton helped me understand, how Public history works. I have to admit, that I had a lot of questions about the practical use of Public History after the first two episodes. Especially the connection between scientifical research methods and presenting the research to a broader audience remained a little unclear.

  • Lissa Kühner
    November 30, 2021Antworten

    In this podcast together with Paul Ashton many very interesting aspects were mentioned. As Giusy Correggia also mentioned, I found the following quote regarding Public History very memorable: „History is not a pyramid with academic on the top, it is an incredibly broad spectrum of practices all of which are important and useful and we need to share that authority across that spectrum. „Here the term „Public History“ is used to describe a kind of practice/exercise. It is a way of making history for and together with a public audience. This audience is not only academics, but every individual, no matter where they are classified in the social context. For this very reason, it is easy to imagine that some academics are suspicious of public history because, for them, it does not correspond to „classical history.“ It seems difficult for academics to accept public history sources such as photographs, art, films, artifacts, and sites as credible historical sources. Indeed, public history encompasses much more than the stubborn rendering of historical data; it illuminates the academic realms of memory research, historical consciousness, and general historiography. I find this „clash“ between academic history and public history very interesting, moreover, public history seems to be winning out over traditional history in my eyes. We’ll see where it takes us in the next few years, but I think public history will take an important place worldwide, especially within younger generations. In my opinion, social media will have an increasing influence on public history and the branch of digital public history will probably expand more and more.

  • Lilli von Stengel
    Dezember 12, 2021Antworten

    Thank you for this very insightful podcast episode!
    Paul Ashton’s thoughts on the accessibility of history were more than just interesting, it changed my thinking towards traditional history studies. We need to see beyond the usual ways of doing research, publishing and staying within the academic sphere to be able to do what history is actually supposed to do. Coming from a background of linguistics, literary and cultural studies this showed me even more how important it is that we work interdisciplinary as well as globally to achieve this accessibility.
    Listening to your discussion on the importance of one’s own personal history in doing history, I started to wonder about your thoughts on the objectivity paradox. Do you believe that a research field such as history, especially when in the public rather than academic sphere, is supposed to at least try to achieve objectivity? Is that even possible in such a politically charged space? I’d love to hear your (as well as the other listener’s) opinion on that.

    • logge
      Februar 3, 2022Antworten

      Academic history has a huge set of well-developed and thoughtful rules and regulations to assure safe and sound knowledge of the past. However, if people don’t believe that we can get to the best possible knowledge through scientificity, then it won’t do much good. If we investigate the practices of doing history as an enlarged history of historiography, we can try to use our tools and methods to understand historiography as a practice, that can (and should) be historicized and thus be accessed with all means academic history has to learn about the past.

  • Benjamin Hufnagel
    Dezember 13, 2021Antworten

    In dieser Podcast-Folge wird von Paul Ashton die wechselseitige Beziehung von Geschichtswissenschaft und Politik angedeutet. Die Wissenschaft sieht er dabei gesellschaftspolitischen Entwicklungen unterworfen. Dies gilt dabei sowohl für die etablierte Geschichtswissenschaft als auch für die Public History, wenngleich sich beide mitunter im Konflikt befinden. In dieser intradisziplinären Kontroverse sieht Ashton die Public History als Opfer hierarchischer (Denk-)Strukturen, weshalb sie permanent die eigene Relevanz und Wissenschaftlichkeit beweisen müsse. So sind zwar beide Parteien gesellschaftspolitischen Einflüssen unterworfen, angesichts ihres Konfliktes jedoch offenbar nicht den gleichen. Spiegeln sich im intradisziplinären Diskurs zwischen der etablierten Geschichtswissenschaft und der Public History also letztlich gesellschaftliche Diskurse wieder?
    Diese These ließe sich noch fortsetzen. Ashton beobachtet ein intradisziplinäres Ringen der Public History um die Anerkennung der eigenen Thesen. Er beschreibt ein hierarchisches Machtgefälle, in dem eine etablierte Gruppe nicht nur Privilegien hält, sondern auch den Zugang zu ihnen durch die Definition des Diskursrahmens kontrollieren kann. Die Public History entzieht sich diesen Definitionen, weshalb die Legitimation ihrer Thesen angezweifelt wird. Versteht man diese Kontroverse als Spiegel gesellschaftlicher Diskurse, stellt sich die Frage, ob die Public History möglicherweise große Gemeinsamkeiten zu anderen gesellschaftspolitischen Strömungen hat, die ebenfalls vorgefertigte Diskursrahmen in Frage stellen. Besteht der gesellschaftspolitische Einfluss auf die Public History darin, dass sie sich der Infragestellung elitärer Privilegien und der Forderung nach Beteiligung verschiedenster gesellschaftlicher Akteur*innen anschließt? Ist die Public History aufgrund dieser Bezüge tatsächlich eine „unprivilegierte“ Subdisziplin? Rüttelt die Public History mit ihren Thesen am Thron etablierter Wissenschaft und deren Beziehungen in gesellschaftspolitische Elitestrukturen? Oder ist die Public History letztlich eine weitere Bewohnerin eines geschichtswissenschaftlichen Elfenbeinturms? Wenngleich sie dort immerhin einen Fensterplatz mit Blick auf die restliche Welt hätte…

    • logge
      Februar 3, 2022Antworten

      Solange die Public History im Turm sitzen bleibt – sicherlich. Soweit sie (auch) Teil der geschichtswissenschaftlichen Forschung und Wissensgenerierung ist, gehört sie da wohl auch hin. Wenn Sie dort jedoch verbleibt und lediglich aus dem Fenster schaut, dann wird sie den Ansprüchen an Partizipation in der Historiographie, Transfer und Third Mission vor allem im Sinne des Co-Kreativen nicht gerecht werden.

  • Martha W.
    Dezember 15, 2021Antworten

    Die Selbstpositionierung, die in dieser Folge in Moderation und von Paul Ashton vorgenommen werden, finde ich enorm wichtig. Für meinen Geschmack hätte das schon früher kommen können, insbesondere, da es in dieser Folge auch viel um Sichtbarkeiten und Hierarchie geht. Insgesamt finde ich die angesprochene Vielfalt wichtig, sowohl in den persönlichen Biographien von Public Historians als auch in den von ihnen genutzten Formaten. Gleichzeitig hab ich den Eindruck, dass Paul Ashton und ein Stück weit auch der gesamte Podcast in seiner Umsetzung nicht ganz konsequent darin sind, den eigenen Ansprüchen gerecht zu werden. Warum lassen wir uns Public History nicht auch von Menschen erklären, die selbst nicht im akademischen Bereich tätig sind?

    Eine andere Frage, rein aus Interesse: Paul Ashton bezieht sich mehrfach auf „heritage industry“, was mir bisher kein Begriff war. Auch wenn ich ein Verständnis davon hab, was darunter fallen könnte, interessiert mich eine Einordnung davon in den deutschsprachigen Kontext. Inwieweit lässt sich das auf den hiesigen Raum übertragen? Sind damit z.B. auch die angesprochenen „neuen“ Formate (die Fernsehsendungen,…) und private Ahnenforschung gemeint oder bezieht sich das auf speziellere Kontexte? Bei einer schnellen Suche bin ich nicht wirklich fündig geworden.

    • logge
      Februar 3, 2022Antworten

      Vielen Dank für den Hinweis, dass eigentlich auch Public Historians zu Wort kommen sollten, die nicht im akademischen Bereich tätig sind. Das wird in der zweiten Staffel gleich umgesetzt werden! Zur Frage der Heritage-Industrie in Deutschland gibt es einen schönen Beitrag bei der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: https://www.bpb.de/apuz/33196/der-mauer-um-die-wette-gedenken | Der Umgang mit „Weltkulturerbe“ ist hier auch recht spannend.

  • Mareike Munsch
    Dezember 16, 2021Antworten

    Paul Ashton defines and differences “Applied History” and “Public History.” According to him, “Public History” is a broader term which includes and brings together more people and issues. It thematizes how we use the past in the present, why we use it, why we need to use it, and why some groups are not mentioned, or even forgotten. In addition, “Public History” includes modern topics such as class sexuality and gender.
    Compared to “Public History,” in “Applied History” historians are most commonly trained academically, before they use their skills outside of the university, for example, in politics or other kinds of institutions. In this context, Paul Ashton mentions that professors in academics see themselves or are seen at the top while applied historians in a government apartment are situated at the bottom. At this point he refers to an, earlier mentioned, description of an hierarchic image of a pyramid within the field of History itself. In the same context, he also mentions the “Blue Color Definition,” which he does not explain further. What does “Blue Color Definition” mean? And what is its meaning within the mentioned context?
    Furthermore, he differences “Applied History” from “Public History” by saying, among other things, that applied historians are commonly trained traditionally at universities. But so far all guests of the podcast have been academics (Georg Koch, Paul Ashton, Paula Hamilton and Tanya Evans). How does that fit into the picture?

    Thanks for the great podcast!

  • Benjamin Berner
    Dezember 20, 2021Antworten

    Wie Sie und auch Paul Ashton in dieser Episode erwähnen, gibt es immer mehr Projekte und Aktivitäten im Bereich Public History, allerdings scheint das Interesse an das Fach Geschichte im akademischen Bereich zu schwinden, an Universitäten und auch bei beruflichen Beschäftigungen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt. Ich studiere Geschichte im Nebenfach und beobachte gerade, dass mehrere Kommilitonen einen Nebenfachwechsel anstreben, da sie sich unter Geschichte etwas anderes vorgestellt haben und es als zu „trocken“ empfinden, besonders bei jüngeren Menschen. Public History sehe ich deshalb als etwas, was die Geschichtsforschung interessanter und moderner machen könnte, weshalb ich die Abneigung einiger Gelehrten nicht nachvollziehen kann. Ich denke, dass beide gut voneinander profitieren könnten, denn das Wissen und die Kompetenzen, die man auf einer Universität erlangt, sind sehr hilfreich, wenn man Projekte im Bereich Public History realisieren möchte und Public History an sich kann die (einige mögen sagen veralteten) Lehrmethoden im Bereich Geschichte an Universitäten inspirieren und so für mehr Vielfalt an Lehrmethoden sorgen. Gibt es Pläne von einer der beiden Seiten (oder vielleicht sogar von beiden) Gespräche miteinander zu führen, die den Grundgedanken haben, dass man von einer Zusammenarbeit profitieren würde?

  • Mareike Munsch
    Dezember 22, 2021Antworten

    Paul Ashton defines and differences “Applied History” and “Public History.” According to him, “Public History” is a broader term which includes and brings together more people and issues. It thematizes how we use the past in the present, why we use it, why we need to use it, and why some groups are not mentioned, or even forgotten. In addition, “Public History” includes modern topics such as class sexuality and gender.
    Compared to “Public History,” in “Applied History” historians are most commonly trained academically, before they use their skills outside of the university, for example, in politics or other kinds of institutions. In this context, Paul Ashton mentions that professors in academics see themselves or are seen at the top while applied historians in a government apartment are situated at the bottom. At this point he refers to an, earlier mentioned, description of an hierarchic image of a pyramid within the field of History itself. In the same context, he also mentions the “Blue Color Definition,” which he does not explain further. What does “Blue Color Definition” mean? And what is its meaning within the mentioned context?
    Furthermore, he differences “Applied History” from “Public History” by saying, among other things, that applied historians are commonly trained traditionally at universities. But so far, all guests of the podcast have been academics (Georg Koch, Paul Ashton, Paula Hamilton and Tanya Evans). How does that fit into the picture?

  • 6938993
    Dezember 23, 2021Antworten

    Ich habe einige Fragen, die sich auf das hierarchische Verständnis von Geschichte beziehen. Lehnen die Geschichtsprofessoren an den Universitäten insbesondere die Sendungen von Guido Knopp ab oder auch weitere Geschichtsdokumentationen? Worin liegt die Ursache? Werden auch andere Geschichtsformate wie nichtakademische Sachbücher, Zeitzeugenberichte und Reenactments abgelehnt?
    Weiterhin haben Sie erwähnt, dass Sie und Ihre Kollegin öfter erleben, dass die Public History kritisiert wird. Wie gehen Sie damit um? Und was kann man dagegen tun, dass die eigene Arbeit infrage gestellt wird und dass nichtakademische Geschichtsformate als unseriös angesehen werden?

  • Lamin Suwaneh
    Dezember 25, 2021Antworten

    Im Rahmen seiner Arbeit mit dem National Council of Public History in den 1990ern und frühen 2000ern, stellte sich heraus, dass die Programme sich mehr auf Britische und Europäische Traditionen fokussierten. Ashton und seine Kollegin interessierten sich mehr für die Erinnerungen und orale Übermittlung von Geschichte, welche von aktiven Akteuren wie Minderheiten und anderen Communities in der Geschichtsschreibung getätigt wurden und wie man diese ausarbeiten und in die Geschichte mit einbeziehen kann. Im Rahmen dieser Erarbeitung bildete sich ein Model heraus, welches beschreibt, dass die Geschichte keine hierarchisch angeordnete Pyramide sei, an welcher bestimmte Teile der Gesellschaft, wie Akademiker, die Spitze darstellen, sondern vielmehr ein breit angeordnetes Spektrum in dem sich verschiedene Akteure mit gleichwertiger Autorität miteinander austauschen sollten. Ein Beispiel für die problematische Trennung zwischen wissenschaftlichen und gesellschaftlichen Kreisen ist die Australische Geschichte und der Umgang mit indigenen Völkern, welcher im wissenschaftlichen Diskurs oftmals zu kurz kommt, weil gewisse Akteure ihn lieber totschweigen möchten, da die Anerkennung dieser Umstände Australien in ein schlechtes Licht rücken lassen würde. In der Public History jedoch, ist das Anhören der Erfahrungen dieser unterdrückten Communities jedoch zwingend notwendig um eine gemeinsame Geschichte zu rekonstruieren, welche ein harmonischeres Zusammenleben in der Gegenwart und Zukunft ermöglichen könnte. Dies wird ermöglicht indem man erforscht welche Aspekte der Vergangenheit wir für die Gegenwart nutzen und warum die Vergangenheit einiger Gruppen stärker oder schwächer repräsentiert wird. Ich finde es sehr lobenswert, dass Ashton dafür plädiert, dass es zwar einen Unterschied zwischen akademischem und nicht akademischem Wissen gibt, dies aber nicht bedeutet, dass eines besser ist als das andere. Sich mit nicht akademischem Wissen und Erfahrungen auseinanderzusetzen, es zu erforschen und damit zu interagieren kann auch in akademischen Kreisen von großem Nutzen sein.

  • Arian Jolani
    Dezember 31, 2021Antworten

    Paul Ashton vergleicht in seinem Kommentar die beiden Begriffe „applied history“ und „public history“, wobei Ersteres als „academics [who] apply their knowledge to public work“ und Zweiteres als eine „broader group“ betreffend („people“, „minorities“, „the public“ etc…) bezeichnet wird. Ein Beispiel für die erweiterte Gruppe der Public History ist für Ashton das Bewusstsein für die historischen Perpspektiven der Aboriginals in Australien. Die traditionelle Geschichtslehre in Austalien versuchte demnach diese nicht zu sehr zu betonen, um ein positiveres Bild des Landes aufrechtzuerhalten als beispielsweise im Falle anderer Länder, wie bei der Apartheid.

    Dabei bemängelt Ashton den Rückgang im Bewusstsein eines derartig geprägten Erbes im Land („heritage consciousness“), sowohl unter Akademikern, als auch in der breiten Öffentlichkeit. In diesem Kontext fällt mir auch das historische Erbe in Deutschland ein, wenn man beispielsweise an den Holocaust denkt. Ich finde, dass Austalien aber auch ein sehr gutes Beispiel für ein Land mit der Notwendigkeit einer breiteren und aktiveren Public History ist, da anscheinend national (und international – man bedenke auch die Sicht auf Australien in Europa) kaum bewusstsein für die Geschichte und Perspektive der Aboriginals besteht, sondern nur für das britische Kolonialerbe.

    Dies betrifft sowohl die allgemeine Öffentlichkeit, als auch akademische Kreise, was Ashton mit dem Ruf nach „more diversity among historians“ betont.
    Mich würde in dem Zusammenhang interessieren, ob die angestrebte Inklusivität der Public History inzwischen auch zu einer konkreten und merkbaren Einbeziehung von Minderheiten in Diskussionen und wissenschaftliche Formate (wie dieses) an der Universität führt? Wie kann man beispielsweise auch für eine sprachliche Inklusivität sorgen und somit Public History an der Universität verwirklichen? Es wurde von einigen Hörern dieses (offenen) Podcasts angemerkt, dass in der Vorlesung Akademiker im Fokus stehen, die aber (wie Ashton) die Inklusion von Nicht-Akademikern in Diskussionsformaten anstreben. Steht Public History demnach nicht noch an einem bisher sehr unterentwickelten Anfangspunkt? Beziehungsweise: ist sie praktisch bisher nur marginal vorhanden und wird als realisiertes Schlagwort, als „echte“ Public History, von ihren Förderern wie auch Paula Hamilton in ihrer Existenz auch auf ihren eigenen (akademischen) Plattformen erst anfangsweise angestrebt? Wie könnte also beispielsweise in Zukunft eine Universitätsveranstaltung in Form einer wirklich inklusiven Public History für alle umgesetzt werden?

  • Konstantina Manou
    Februar 3, 2022Antworten

    In dieser Podcast-Folge wurde unter anderem die Trennung von Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft problematisiert. Zusätzlich wurde thematisiert, dass es für die Geschichtswissenschaft ertragreicher wäre, kein Pyramidenschema mit Histroker*innen an der Spitze aufzuweisen. Viel eher sollte die Geschichtswissenschat als ein breites Spektrum organisiert sein. Paul Ashton führt hierzu weiter aus, dass die Mitglieder der Wissenschaft zeitgleich Mitglieder der Gesellschaft seien. Mit der Geschichtswissenschaft als wissenschaftliche Disziplin gingen somit unweigerlich soziale, gesellschaftliche und politische Kontexte einher und gewännen an Bedeutung. Ich stimme diesem Punkt zu. In der historischen Forschung sollte sich widerspiegeln, was die Menschen bewegt. Verschiedenen soziale und gesellschaftliche Kontexte können unterschiedliche historische Fragestellungen hervorbringen, welche die wissenschaftliche Forschung prägen können. Das spiegelt sich auch in den heutigen Forschungsschwerpunkten wider, in denen es oftmals um Frauen-, Gender- oder Alltagsgeschichte geht. Auch stimme ich dem Aspekt zu, dass eine Öffnung der Geschichtswissenschaft gegenüber einem breiteren Spektrum Menschengruppen eine Stimme geben kann, welche im Besonderen wegen einer stark eurozentrischen Geschichtsprägung zuvor nicht diese Möglichkeit hatten. Außerdem stimme ich dem Aspekt zu, dass hierfür keineswegs eine Minderung des Qualitätsstandards historischer Arbeit nötig ist. Vielmehr wäre es wünschenswert in einen diversen Dialog zu kommen und hierbei wissenschaftlich fundierte Arbeitsweisen auf verschiedene Zugänge zu historischem Denken und Vermitteln historischer Darstellungen anzuwenden.

  • Franziska Lahn
    Februar 15, 2022Antworten

    Prof. Ashton talks about the conflict between the traditanalist historians and the more open minded. The conflict I am referring to includes the use of earlier sources and history. What kind of arguments did they came forward with to dismiss of the 80s civil rights movement and differ between popular history and regular history? Why did they have a problem with art works and other new sources, especially if we often use art like woodwork and paintings to help us reconstruct or understand history? Even if someone uses the argument, that the new art is far more abstract and has to be interpreted to be of any use the same goes for the art of the past and the poems written. We decided one day that a curten word means a curten thing even if its proven that the languag is always changing and so do the meanings of words. It’s hypocritical to say that only the older art works are capable of helping to understand a culture or a society even if you can never truly know the exact thought of the artist. In contrast to the paintings of the middle ages it is still possible to ask artist what was on there mind making there art.

  • Valentin Kraner
    Februar 28, 2022Antworten

    Australien scheint für die Public History einige Standortvorteile zu haben: Zum einen ist die Geschichtswissenschaft bei weitem nicht so festgesetzt und traditionalistisch wie die in Deutschland, zum anderen macht es den Eindruck, als hätte die mehrheitlich europäischstämmige Bevölkerung erkannt, dass die Identitätsbildung nur unter Einbezug der gemeinsamen Geschichte möglich ist, auch wenn dabei Ungerechtigkeiten und Verbrechen der Vorfahren untersucht werden. Diese Priorisierung der Heritageforschung wäre in Deutschland so wohl nicht denkbar. Prof. Ashton macht dabei unmissverständlich, wie breit aufgestellt die Public History sein muss. Das scheint nur logisch, schließlich muss sie sich an unterschiedlichste Zielgruppen richten, mit eigenen präferierten Medien, Methoden und Stilen.

Leave a comment

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.